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THAT COLD BLUE LIGHT 

The good news is more young people are coming to our concerts.
The bad news is most of them rarely look up from their phones and hand-held devices.

It saddens me to look out at them from the bandstand, to see them there in the audience, sitting in the darkness,
looking not to the stage but downward, their expressionless faces illuminated by cold blue light.

I want so badly for them to experience—truly and without distraction—the gift of a soulfully crafted melody.

I want to share with them the thing I love most: the pure emotional power of instrumental music,
without the need for lyrics, explication or visual spectacle.

Am I naive? In today's world, is it even possible?

ZERO HOUR 

Boise High School
October 17, 2014

Many high schools throughout the USA now expect students
who want to participate in jazz band to arrive before dawn—'zero hour'—
prior to the beginning of the actual school day. Is this reasonable?

Look Again 

I've learned a lot from my years of watching Saturday morning cartoons.

For example, you think you know someone.

You think you know what their strengths and weaknesses are.
You think you know their character.
You think you know what they're capable of.

You get to know someone a little...a first impression.
You form an opinion about them and you carry it around with you for years.

You think you know all about that person—but you're dead wrong.

You don't know them at all.

You only saw what you wanted to see.
You only saw what you were ready to see.
And you only know what they wanted to show you.

First impressions are incomplete and quickly out of date.

To really know someone, you must update your perceptions of them continually.

Because people change. They evolve.
They experience pain and gain and loss and transformation.

As they're tested by the vicissitudes of life, they develop new powers and capabilities.

If you really want to see someone as they ARE, keep an open mind,
and take another look.

The Frugal Flugel Recommends: 100 Yen Shops! 

When in Japan, the Frugal Flugel recommends 100 YEN SHOPS, where packaged meals and snacks, groceries, water, toiletries, household items and more are available for about a buck. In addition to familiar picnic items like sandwiches, dried fruits and nuts, 100 Yen Shops offer a chance to sample such Japanese treats as sembei (rice crackers), iwashi (sardines) and ika (dried squid).

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