CORN PONE 



Whooo, I've been craving CORN PONE all day!

For my yankee friends, corn pone is one of the most beloved comfort foods in all of southern cuisine: a thick cornbread that's been cooked over a fire in a cast iron skillet.

There are many ways to enjoy corn pone. Some folks like to bake it in the oven and serve it with a bowl of beans or hearty stew. Others like to mash up warm chunks of the stuff into a cold glass of buttermilk, then devour the entire mixture, dessert-style, with a long spoon.

As for me, I like corn pone best when it's been fried in butter until the edges are as brown and crunchy as hushpuppies.

Readers of Mark Twain (not to mention friends of my Dad) are no doubt already familiar with "corn pone humor," the southern gentleman's ready penchant for pulling your leg, making silly, off-color jokes and telling the tallest and most ridiculous of tales.

As you might have guessed, people can be corn pones, too. Southerners affectionately tease unsophisticated country folks for acting "like a corn pone."

More often than not, the designation is intended not as an insult, but as a term of endearment for the best kind of friends — the ones back home who never put on airs, like you for who you are, and get along easily with just about anybody.

2 Comments

  • Mitch Hampton

    Mitch Hampton

    It is so refreshing and even truthful to actually read something about food that doesn't involve discussion of nutritional health, chemical components, population weight, disease, trans-fat, omega3s. That is, you are writing about the experience of food as food - eating the food, rather than some moralistic thing about farm labor, organic, pesticide, localvores, omnivores ad nauseum
    It is so refreshing and even truthful to actually read something about food that doesn't involve discussion of nutritional health, chemical components, population weight, disease, trans-fat, omega3s. That is, you are writing about the experience of food as food - eating the food, rather than some moralistic thing about farm labor, organic, pesticide, localvores, omnivores ad nauseum
  • Dianna

    Dianna

    My old indian grandmother called this dog water and we all loved it served warm sliced and filled with butter with beans or cabbage. Yummy!
    My old indian grandmother called this dog water and we all loved it served warm sliced and filled with butter with beans or cabbage. Yummy!